Positive Thought

When Someone puts you down, Just laugh it off and tell them ” I am the best person I can be, your just jealous” before you leave the house go to any mirror in the house and say to yourself ” I am a wonderful person, I love myself, I beautiful and Hot damn everyone likes me”  It sure help!!!

Advertisements
By Handy Circle Resource Society

Home Support

About Us

Northern Home Care is a professional nursing organization. We provide professional health services for private clients, not for profit organizations, businesses, and government agencies in Prince George, Quesnel, Terrace, Fort St. John, Williams Lake, Smithers and most of Northern British Columbia.

Our family of Health Professionals has been providing health services for the residents of Northern British Columbia for over 15 years.

Caring for you and your family is our “number one priority” and we offer specialized services focused on the health and well being of the elderly and the disabled.

Northern Home Care means quality, compassionate family health services.

We have four locations to serve you in Prince George, Quesnel, Terrace, and Fort St. John. Although we don’t have offices in every Northern city or town, we are able to provide service and care to most areas in our region. Please call for more information to to see if we provide care in your city!

We focus on Health at Home, Health at Work and Health in the Community.

Caring for you and your family is our “number one priority”.

While loved ones often need care, their family and friends may feel the stress and daily pressures of providing care. Our team at Northern Home Care are there to support both you and your loved ones, helping them live there lives more fully and independently.

Your care will be individualized, quality focused, and central for living longer, healthier and more independent.

Affiliations:

Northern Home Care is proud to play a role in our local community and has affiliation’s with the following organizations:

  • College of Registered Nurses of BC
  • College of Licensed Practical Nurses of BC
  • Canadian Home Care Association of BC
  • Gerontological Nurses Group of BC
  • BC Community Care Aide Registry
  • Canadian Diabetic Association
  • BC Home Care association
  • Prince George Council of seniors
  • BC Alzheimer’s Society

Please contact our friendly staff to arrange a Free Health Care Needs Assessment.

Call Toll Free: 1.866.271.2850 or Email Us Today!

By Handy Circle Resource Society

Lifeline

 It saved my life, it will save yours!!!!!!!!!!! it is a life saver!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Stphanie

Father’s Day Special Offer

Call Philips Lifeline Now
1-866-681-7925
Email Us

Medical Alert Systems & Devices

Happy Father's Day

HomeSafe Medical Alert Service from Philips Lifeline HomeSafe
Canada’s most trusted medical alert system

Standard | with AutoAlert

The medical alert system that gives you freedom to go where you want, when you want New! GoSafe
Mobile Personal Emergency Response System

GoSafe

CheckIn Service from Canada's most trusted medical alert service provider - Philips Lifeline Let us check in on your loved one when you can’t be there

CheckIn Service

Featured

Canada’s # 1 Medical Alert Service

Philips Lifeline is an easy-to-use personal response service that lets you summon help any time of the day or night – even if you can’t speak. All you have to do is press your Personal Help Button, worn on a wristband or pendant, and a trained Personal Response Associate will ensure you get help fast. That’s why Philips Lifeline provides the #1 Medical Alert Service to offer you something else: peace of mind.

Dependability is key to peace of mind. That’s why doctors, hospitals, and professional caregivers trust our Medical Alert Service.

Only Philips Lifeline offers AutoAlert – is the most widely adopted fall detection in North America.

For an added layer of protection, AutoAlert lets us know if you need help – even if you can’t.  Its superior technology is designed to automatically detect most falls – and achieve a low rate of false alarms – by distinguishing between actual falls and everyday activities like sitting, standing and reclining. It even gives you 30 seconds to cancel an alarm, or you can cancel by starting to stand back up.

All calls go directly to the Lifeline-owned Response Centre in Canada. You can always be sure that your call will be answered by highly trained and caring Response Associates who will access your profile, contact the people you’ve identified, and request the help you want. Our Response Associates will even follow up to confirm that help has arrived.

Live independently at home with the Lifeline Medical Alert Service

This year 1.4 million people, 65 and older will fall. If you or a loved one experience a medical emergency, time is of the essence. That’s where Philips Lifeline can help, connecting you to the right help for the situation, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year at the push of a button. Whether you need emergency services or just the assistance of a family member or friend to help you get back on your feet, we can help.

Confidence, reliability, and peace of mind are qualities that you deserve when caring for an elderly parent or a loved one, and they’re qualities that can be found with Lifeline.

Keeping seniors active with Philips Lifeline’s new GoSafe system

Watch Video - Keeping seniors active with Philips Lifeline's new GoSafe system

Ruth has been a Philips Lifeline subscriber after she experienced a fall over 14 years ago.  While Ruth has enjoyed the feeling of confidence and security her Lifeline button service provides, she always wanted to feel the same peace of mind when she left the house.  As an active senior who volunteers at the local hospital, walks her dog, and runs her own errands, Ruth jumped at the chance to get GoSafe, our new mobile medical alert service.  Featuring the power of up to six location technologies, GoSafe gives seniors the assurance to get up and go while being protected by our 24/7, Canada-based response centre which protects more seniors than any other medical alert service. Watch Ruth’s story and how GoSafe is now a part of her active lifestyle.

*#1 claim based on number of subscribers. Available at participating Lifeline programs. GoSafe and

By Handy Circle Resource Society

Revenue Canada scams

Protect yourself against fraud

Video: Beware of scammers posing as CRA employees

Protect yourself against fraud

Video: Beware of scammers posing as CRA employees

Protect yourself against fraud

Video: Beware of scammers posing as CRA employees

Current position:00:00:00

Total time:00:02:28

Know how to recognize a scam
Examples of fraudulent communications
How to protect yourself from identity theft
Have you been a victim?
Scam stories
External resources
Print-ready posters and handout for service providers

Know how to recognize a scam

There are many fraud types, including new ones invented daily.

Taxpayers should be vigilant when they receive, either by telephone, mail, text message or email, a fraudulent communication that claims to be from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) requesting personal information such as a social insurance number, credit card number, bank account number, or passport number.

These scams may insist that this personal information is needed so that the taxpayer can receive a refund or a benefit payment. Cases of fraudulent communication could also involve threatening or coercive language to scare individuals into paying fictitious debt to the CRA. Other communications urge taxpayers to visit a fake CRA website where the taxpayer is then asked to verify their identity by entering personal information. These are scams and taxpayers should never respond to these fraudulent communications or click on any of the links provided.

To identify communications not from the CRA, be aware of these guidelines.

If you receive a call saying you owe money to the CRA, you can call us or check My Account to be sure.

If you have signed up for online mail (available through My Account, My Business Account, and Represent a Client), the CRA will do the following:

  • send a registration confirmation email to the address you provided for online mail service for an individual or a business; and
  • send an email to the address you provided to notify you when new online mail is available to view in the CRA’s secure online services portal.

The CRA will not do the following:

  • send email with a link and ask you to divulge personal or financial information;

Exception:

If you call the CRA to request a form or a link for specific information, a CRA agent will forward the information you are requesting to your email during the telephone call. This is the only circumstance in which the CRA will send an email containing links.

  • ask for personal information of any kind by email or text message.
  • request payments by prepaid credit cards.
  • give taxpayer information to another person, unless formal authorization is provided by the taxpayer.
  • leave personal information on an answering machine.

When in doubt, ask yourself the following:

  • Did I sign up to receive online mail through My Account, My Business Account, or Represent a Client?
  • Did I provide my email address on my income tax and benefit return to receive mail online?
  • Am I expecting more money from the CRA?
  • Does this sound too good to be true?
  • Is the requester asking for information I would not provide in my tax return?
  • Is the requester asking for information I know the CRA already has on file for me?

If you do have a debt with the CRA and can’t pay in full, take action right away. For more information, go to When you owe money – collections at the CRA.

How to protect yourself from identity theft

  • Never provide personal information through the Internet or by email. The CRA does not ask you to provide personal information by email.
  • Be suspicious if you are ever asked to pay taxes or fees to the CRA on lottery or sweepstakes winnings. You do not have to pay taxes or fees on these types of winnings. These requests are scams.
  • Keep your access codes, user ID, passwords, and PINs secret.
  • Keep your address current with all government departments and agencies.
  • Choose your tax preparer carefully! Make sure you choose someone you trust and check their references. Always review your return, agree with the content before filing, and follow up to make sure you receive your notice of assessment, since it contains important financial and personal information that belongs to you.
  • Before supporting any charity, use the CRA website at www.cra.gc.ca/charities to find out if the charity is registered and get more information on the way it does business.
  • Be careful before you click on links in any email you receive. Some criminals may be using a technique known as phishing to steal your personal information when you click on the link.
  • Caller ID is a useful function. However, the information displayed can be altered by criminals. Never use only the displayed information to confirm the identity of the caller whether it be an individual, a company or a government entity.
  • Protect your social insurance number. Don’t use it as a piece of ID and never reveal it to anyone unless you are certain the person asking for it is legally entitled to that information. If an organization asks for your social insurance number, ask if it is legally required to collect it, and if not, offer other forms of ID.
  • Pay attention to your billing cycle and ask about any missing account statements or suspicious transactions.
  • Shred unwanted documents or store them in a secure place. Make sure that documents with your name and SIN are secure.
  • Immediately report lost or stolen credit or debit cards.
  • Carry only the ID you need.
  • Do not write down any passwords or carry them with you.
  • Ask a trusted neighbour to pick up your mail when you are away or ask that a hold be placed on delivery.

Have you been a victim?

You should report deceptive telemarketing to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre online or by calling 1-888-495-8501.

If you suspect you may be the victim of fraud or have been tricked into giving personal or financial information, contact your local police service.

If the CRA has confirmed that a taxpayer’s information has been compromised, the Agency will act to prevent the fraudulent use of the information involving systems and processes for which the CRA is responsible.

If your social insurance number (SIN) has been stolen, you should contact Service Canada at 1-800-206-7218. For more information, see Social Insurance Number (Service Canada website).

You can ask the CRA to disable online access to your information on the CRA login services by calling the e-Services Helpdesk. After access to your information is disabled, you may change your mind and want access again. If so, you can call the e-Services Helpdesk and ask that your access be re-activated.

If you think your CRA user ID or the password you use in personal dealings with the CRA has been compromised, contact our e-Services Helpdesk.

Scam stories

  • Select the image below to read their storyImage described below
    Image description
  • Select the image below to read her storyImage described below
    Image description
  • Select the image below to read her storyImage described below
    Image description

    Meet Irene
    Irene is 80 years old. She has fallen victim to an e-mail phishing scam.
    Find out more about Irene’s story and how you can protect yourself against fraud.

Current position:00:00:00

Total time:00:02:28

Know how to recognize a scam
Examples of fraudulent communications
How to protect yourself from identity theft
Have you been a victim?
Scam stories
External resources
Print-ready posters and handout for service providers

Know how to recognize a scam

There are many fraud types, including new ones invented daily.

Taxpayers should be vigilant when they receive, either by telephone, mail, text message or email, a fraudulent communication that claims to be from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) requesting personal information such as a social insurance number, credit card number, bank account number, or passport number.

These scams may insist that this personal information is needed so that the taxpayer can receive a refund or a benefit payment. Cases of fraudulent communication could also involve threatening or coercive language to scare individuals into paying fictitious debt to the CRA. Other communications urge taxpayers to visit a fake CRA website where the taxpayer is then asked to verify their identity by entering personal information. These are scams and taxpayers should never respond to these fraudulent communications or click on any of the links provided.

To identify communications not from the CRA, be aware of these guidelines.

If you receive a call saying you owe money to the CRA, you can call us or check My Account to be sure.

If you have signed up for online mail (available through My Account, My Business Account, and Represent a Client), the CRA will do the following:

  • send a registration confirmation email to the address you provided for online mail service for an individual or a business; and
  • send an email to the address you provided to notify you when new online mail is available to view in the CRA’s secure online services portal.

The CRA will not do the following:

  • send email with a link and ask you to divulge personal or financial information;

Exception:

If you call the CRA to request a form or a link for specific information, a CRA agent will forward the information you are requesting to your email during the telephone call. This is the only circumstance in which the CRA will send an email containing links.

  • ask for personal information of any kind by email or text message.
  • request payments by prepaid credit cards.
  • give taxpayer information to another person, unless formal authorization is provided by the taxpayer.
  • leave personal information on an answering machine.

When in doubt, ask yourself the following:

  • Did I sign up to receive online mail through My Account, My Business Account, or Represent a Client?
  • Did I provide my email address on my income tax and benefit return to receive mail online?
  • Am I expecting more money from the CRA?
  • Does this sound too good to be true?
  • Is the requester asking for information I would not provide in my tax return?
  • Is the requester asking for information I know the CRA already has on file for me?

If you do have a debt with the CRA and can’t pay in full, take action right away. For more information, go to When you owe money – collections at the CRA.

How to protect yourself from identity theft

  • Never provide personal information through the Internet or by email. The CRA does not ask you to provide personal information by email.
  • Be suspicious if you are ever asked to pay taxes or fees to the CRA on lottery or sweepstakes winnings. You do not have to pay taxes or fees on these types of winnings. These requests are scams.
  • Keep your access codes, user ID, passwords, and PINs secret.
  • Keep your address current with all government departments and agencies.
  • Choose your tax preparer carefully! Make sure you choose someone you trust and check their references. Always review your return, agree with the content before filing, and follow up to make sure you receive your notice of assessment, since it contains important financial and personal information that belongs to you.
  • Before supporting any charity, use the CRA website at www.cra.gc.ca/charities to find out if the charity is registered and get more information on the way it does business.
  • Be careful before you click on links in any email you receive. Some criminals may be using a technique known as phishing to steal your personal information when you click on the link.
  • Caller ID is a useful function. However, the information displayed can be altered by criminals. Never use only the displayed information to confirm the identity of the caller whether it be an individual, a company or a government entity.
  • Protect your social insurance number. Don’t use it as a piece of ID and never reveal it to anyone unless you are certain the person asking for it is legally entitled to that information. If an organization asks for your social insurance number, ask if it is legally required to collect it, and if not, offer other forms of ID.
  • Pay attention to your billing cycle and ask about any missing account statements or suspicious transactions.
  • Shred unwanted documents or store them in a secure place. Make sure that documents with your name and SIN are secure.
  • Immediately report lost or stolen credit or debit cards.
  • Carry only the ID you need.
  • Do not write down any passwords or carry them with you.
  • Ask a trusted neighbour to pick up your mail when you are away or ask that a hold be placed on delivery.

Have you been a victim?

You should report deceptive telemarketing to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre online or by calling 1-888-495-8501.

If you suspect you may be the victim of fraud or have been tricked into giving personal or financial information, contact your local police service.

If the CRA has confirmed that a taxpayer’s information has been compromised, the Agency will act to prevent the fraudulent use of the information involving systems and processes for which the CRA is responsible.

If your social insurance number (SIN) has been stolen, you should contact Service Canada at 1-800-206-7218. For more information, see Social Insurance Number (Service Canada website).

You can ask the CRA to disable online access to your information on the CRA login services by calling the e-Services Helpdesk. After access to your information is disabled, you may change your mind and want access again. If so, you can call the e-Services Helpdesk and ask that your access be re-activated.

If you think your CRA user ID or the password you use in personal dealings with the CRA has been compromised, contact our e-Services Helpdesk.

Scam stories

  • Select the image below to read their storyImage described below
    Image description
  • Select the image below to read her storyImage described below
    Image description
  • Select the image below to read her storyImage described below
    Image description

    Meet Irene
    Irene is 80 years old. She has fallen victim to an e-mail phishing scam.
    Find out more about Irene’s story and how you can protect yourself against fraud.

    Protect yourself against fraud

    Video: Beware of scammers posing as CRA employees

    Current position:00:00:00

    Total time:00:02:28

    Know how to recognize a scam
    Examples of fraudulent communications
    How to protect yourself from identity theft
    Have you been a victim?
    Scam stories
    External resources
    Print-ready posters and handout for service providers

    Know how to recognize a scam

    There are many fraud types, including new ones invented daily.

    Taxpayers should be vigilant when they receive, either by telephone, mail, text message or email, a fraudulent communication that claims to be from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) requesting personal information such as a social insurance number, credit card number, bank account number, or passport number.

    These scams may insist that this personal information is needed so that the taxpayer can receive a refund or a benefit payment. Cases of fraudulent communication could also involve threatening or coercive language to scare individuals into paying fictitious debt to the CRA. Other communications urge taxpayers to visit a fake CRA website where the taxpayer is then asked to verify their identity by entering personal information. These are scams and taxpayers should never respond to these fraudulent communications or click on any of the links provided.

    To identify communications not from the CRA, be aware of these guidelines.

    If you receive a call saying you owe money to the CRA, you can call us or check My Account to be sure.

    If you have signed up for online mail (available through My Account, My Business Account, and Represent a Client), the CRA will do the following:

    • send a registration confirmation email to the address you provided for online mail service for an individual or a business; and
    • send an email to the address you provided to notify you when new online mail is available to view in the CRA’s secure online services portal.

    The CRA will not do the following:

    • send email with a link and ask you to divulge personal or financial information;

    Exception:

    If you call the CRA to request a form or a link for specific information, a CRA agent will forward the information you are requesting to your email during the telephone call. This is the only circumstance in which the CRA will send an email containing links.

    • ask for personal information of any kind by email or text message.
    • request payments by prepaid credit cards.
    • give taxpayer information to another person, unless formal authorization is provided by the taxpayer.
    • leave personal information on an answering machine.

    When in doubt, ask yourself the following:

    • Did I sign up to receive online mail through My Account, My Business Account, or Represent a Client?
    • Did I provide my email address on my income tax and benefit return to receive mail online?
    • Am I expecting more money from the CRA?
    • Does this sound too good to be true?
    • Is the requester asking for information I would not provide in my tax return?
    • Is the requester asking for information I know the CRA already has on file for me?

    If you do have a debt with the CRA and can’t pay in full, take action right away. For more information, go to When you owe money – collections at the CRA.

    How to protect yourself from identity theft

    • Never provide personal information through the Internet or by email. The CRA does not ask you to provide personal information by email.
    • Be suspicious if you are ever asked to pay taxes or fees to the CRA on lottery or sweepstakes winnings. You do not have to pay taxes or fees on these types of winnings. These requests are scams.
    • Keep your access codes, user ID, passwords, and PINs secret.
    • Keep your address current with all government departments and agencies.
    • Choose your tax preparer carefully! Make sure you choose someone you trust and check their references. Always review your return, agree with the content before filing, and follow up to make sure you receive your notice of assessment, since it contains important financial and personal information that belongs to you.
    • Before supporting any charity, use the CRA website at www.cra.gc.ca/charities to find out if the charity is registered and get more information on the way it does business.
    • Be careful before you click on links in any email you receive. Some criminals may be using a technique known as phishing to steal your personal information when you click on the link.
    • Caller ID is a useful function. However, the information displayed can be altered by criminals. Never use only the displayed information to confirm the identity of the caller whether it be an individual, a company or a government entity.
    • Protect your social insurance number. Don’t use it as a piece of ID and never reveal it to anyone unless you are certain the person asking for it is legally entitled to that information. If an organization asks for your social insurance number, ask if it is legally required to collect it, and if not, offer other forms of ID.
    • Pay attention to your billing cycle and ask about any missing account statements or suspicious transactions.
    • Shred unwanted documents or store them in a secure place. Make sure that documents with your name and SIN are secure.
    • Immediately report lost or stolen credit or debit cards.
    • Carry only the ID you need.
    • Do not write down any passwords or carry them with you.
    • Ask a trusted neighbour to pick up your mail when you are away or ask that a hold be placed on delivery.

    Have you been a victim?

    You should report deceptive telemarketing to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre online or by calling 1-888-495-8501.

    If you suspect you may be the victim of fraud or have been tricked into giving personal or financial information, contact your local police service.

    If the CRA has confirmed that a taxpayer’s information has been compromised, the Agency will act to prevent the fraudulent use of the information involving systems and processes for which the CRA is responsible.

    If your social insurance number (SIN) has been stolen, you should contact Service Canada at 1-800-206-7218. For more information, see Social Insurance Number (Service Canada website).

    You can ask the CRA to disable online access to your information on the CRA login services by calling the e-Services Helpdesk. After access to your information is disabled, you may change your mind and want access again. If so, you can call the e-Services Helpdesk and ask that your access be re-activated.

    If you think your CRA user ID or the password you use in personal dealings with the CRA has been compromised, contact our e-Services Helpdesk.

    Scam stories

    • Select the image below to read their storyImage described below
      Image description
    • Select the image below to read her storyImage described below
      Image description
    • Select the image below to read her storyImage described below
      Image description

      Meet Irene
      Irene is 80 years old. She has fallen victim to an e-mail phishing scam.
      Find out more about Irene’s story and how you can protect yourself against fraud.

Current position:00:00:00

Total time:00:02:28

Know how to recognize a scam
Examples of fraudulent communications
How to protect yourself from identity theft
Have you been a victim?
Scam stories
External resources
Print-ready posters and handout for service providers

Know how to recognize a scam

There are many fraud types, including new ones invented daily.

Taxpayers should be vigilant when they receive, either by telephone, mail, text message or email, a fraudulent communication that claims to be from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) requesting personal information such as a social insurance number, credit card number, bank account number, or passport number.

These scams may insist that this personal information is needed so that the taxpayer can receive a refund or a benefit payment. Cases of fraudulent communication could also involve threatening or coercive language to scare individuals into paying fictitious debt to the CRA. Other communications urge taxpayers to visit a fake CRA website where the taxpayer is then asked to verify their identity by entering personal information. These are scams and taxpayers should never respond to these fraudulent communications or click on any of the links provided.

To identify communications not from the CRA, be aware of these guidelines.

If you receive a call saying you owe money to the CRA, you can call us or check My Account to be sure.

If you have signed up for online mail (available through My Account, My Business Account, and Represent a Client), the CRA will do the following:

  • send a registration confirmation email to the address you provided for online mail service for an individual or a business; and
  • send an email to the address you provided to notify you when new online mail is available to view in the CRA’s secure online services portal.

The CRA will not do the following:

  • send email with a link and ask you to divulge personal or financial information;

Exception:

If you call the CRA to request a form or a link for specific information, a CRA agent will forward the information you are requesting to your email during the telephone call. This is the only circumstance in which the CRA will send an email containing links.

  • ask for personal information of any kind by email or text message.
  • request payments by prepaid credit cards.
  • give taxpayer information to another person, unless formal authorization is provided by the taxpayer.
  • leave personal information on an answering machine.

When in doubt, ask yourself the following:

  • Did I sign up to receive online mail through My Account, My Business Account, or Represent a Client?
  • Did I provide my email address on my income tax and benefit return to receive mail online?
  • Am I expecting more money from the CRA?
  • Does this sound too good to be true?
  • Is the requester asking for information I would not provide in my tax return?
  • Is the requester asking for information I know the CRA already has on file for me?

If you do have a debt with the CRA and can’t pay in full, take action right away. For more information, go to When you owe money – collections at the CRA.

How to protect yourself from identity theft

  • Never provide personal information through the Internet or by email. The CRA does not ask you to provide personal information by email.
  • Be suspicious if you are ever asked to pay taxes or fees to the CRA on lottery or sweepstakes winnings. You do not have to pay taxes or fees on these types of winnings. These requests are scams.
  • Keep your access codes, user ID, passwords, and PINs secret.
  • Keep your address current with all government departments and agencies.
  • Choose your tax preparer carefully! Make sure you choose someone you trust and check their references. Always review your return, agree with the content before filing, and follow up to make sure you receive your notice of assessment, since it contains important financial and personal information that belongs to you.
  • Before supporting any charity, use the CRA website at www.cra.gc.ca/charities to find out if the charity is registered and get more information on the way it does business.
  • Be careful before you click on links in any email you receive. Some criminals may be using a technique known as phishing to steal your personal information when you click on the link.
  • Caller ID is a useful function. However, the information displayed can be altered by criminals. Never use only the displayed information to confirm the identity of the caller whether it be an individual, a company or a government entity.
  • Protect your social insurance number. Don’t use it as a piece of ID and never reveal it to anyone unless you are certain the person asking for it is legally entitled to that information. If an organization asks for your social insurance number, ask if it is legally required to collect it, and if not, offer other forms of ID.
  • Pay attention to your billing cycle and ask about any missing account statements or suspicious transactions.
  • Shred unwanted documents or store them in a secure place. Make sure that documents with your name and SIN are secure.
  • Immediately report lost or stolen credit or debit cards.
  • Carry only the ID you need.
  • Do not write down any passwords or carry them with you.
  • Ask a trusted neighbour to pick up your mail when you are away or ask that a hold be placed on delivery.

Have you been a victim?

You should report deceptive telemarketing to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre online or by calling 1-888-495-8501.

If you suspect you may be the victim of fraud or have been tricked into giving personal or financial information, contact your local police service.

If the CRA has confirmed that a taxpayer’s information has been compromised, the Agency will act to prevent the fraudulent use of the information involving systems and processes for which the CRA is responsible.

If your social insurance number (SIN) has been stolen, you should contact Service Canada at 1-800-206-7218. For more information, see Social Insurance Number (Service Canada website).

You can ask the CRA to disable online access to your information on the CRA login services by calling the e-Services Helpdesk. After access to your information is disabled, you may change your mind and want access again. If so, you can call the e-Services Helpdesk and ask that your access be re-activated.

If you think your CRA user ID or the password you use in personal dealings with the CRA has been compromised, contact our e-Services Helpdesk.

Scam stories

  • Select the image below to read their storyImage described below
    Image description
  • Select the image below to read her storyImage described below
    Image description
  • Select the image below to read her storyImage described below
    Image description

    Meet Irene
    Irene is 80 years old. She has fallen victim to an e-mail phishing scam.
    Find out more about Irene’s story and how you can protect yourself against fraud.

By Handy Circle Resource Society

THE MS WALK

13343084_10154094390876638_673254450247013905_n13344691_10154094392426638_8206422937610548843_n.jpg13335683_10154094394126638_9019884388554571149_n.jpgms walk

.There was a Ms walk in Fort George Park, June.5,2016th and it was as success. PG Surg. Med, Ms Tent and Med chair was there, there was  sandwiches there. and we made over $2000. There was Shirley Bond who helped out on this walk, Judy Dix was there cheering us on, also Stephanie Dix also was there participating with Ken, it was a really beautiful day. thank you for everyone for donating and all your support.

By Handy Circle Resource Society